Recipe: Julie’s Cauliflower Patties

By Julie Floyd

Ingredients
1/4 cup finely diced onion (optional)
1 head cauliflower, finely chopped, cooked and drained well
1 cup panko crumbs
1 large egg, lightly beaten
2 tablespoons low-fat mayonnaise
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
Dash of hot sauce
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
Extra virgin olive oil

Instructions
Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Mix 1/2 cup panko, the egg and mayonnaise in a small bowl. Add Worcestershire, mustard and hot sauce. Fold the cooked, chopped cauliflower into the panko mixture. Add 1/4 teaspoon salt and a pinch of pepper. Shape into patties, and cook until crispy golden brown.


Recommended by Julie Floyd  Contact
UT Martin
Associate Professor, Department of Nursing

Disclaimer
Posts represent the views, expertise and recommendations of their authors and do not necessarily reflect an endorsement by the University of Tennessee. Furthermore, the content of the blog is for informational purposes only. The content of the blog is not, and is not intended to be used as, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

Recipe: Fruity and Nutty Whole Grain Cereal

By Rebecca Krukowksi

Ingredients
6 cups of old-fashioned rolled oats
1 cup of oat bran
1 cup of wheat germ
1/2 cup of ground pecans
1/2 cup of ground walnuts
1/2 cup of sliced or slivered almonds
1/2 cup of flaxseed
1/3 cup of sesame seeds
1/2 cup of sunflower seeds
3/4 cup of honey or molasses
3/4 cups of oil (any type other than olive oil)
2 tablespoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup of any combination of dried fruit (chopped if needed)

Instructions
Combine oats, oat bran, wheat germ, nuts and seeds in a bowl or pan with high sides. Mix well and set aside. Combine honey/molasses, oil, cinnamon and vanilla in a measuring cup. Pour over the oat mixture. Toss until well blended.

Microwave on 50% power (don’t miss this or you will burn your cereal) for 10 minutes. Stir well and microwave again on 50% power for 10 minutes. Cool. Add dried fruit. Store in refrigerator in air-tight container.


Recommended by Rebecca Krukowksi  Contact
Assistant Professor, Department of Preventive Medicine
UT Health Science Center

Disclaimer
Posts represent the views, expertise and recommendations of their authors and do not necessarily reflect an endorsement by the University of Tennessee. Furthermore, the content of the blog is for informational purposes only. The content of the blog is not, and is not intended to be used as, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

Addressing Obesity and Unhealthy Lifestyle Choices

By Erica Jenkins

While one out of every three Tennesseans is obese, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it’s important to realize that the core problem isn’t obesity—it’s the combination of multiple unhealthy lifestyle choices.

To help Tennesseans understand how to overcome health-related challenges, UT Extension’s Family and Consumer Sciences division has put together a research-based program, “Pathweighs to Health.” The six-week program provides information and a support network to help jumpstart lifestyle change.

Below are four tips to help you get started. They were developed by Donna Calhoun, a Family and Consumer Sciences agent who administered the program in Polk County in February 2014.

TIP 1: IT’S HARD FOR A REASON

With fast-food restaurants beating out local grocery stores in convenience and sometimes price, it can be hard to make the choice to eat at home or plan a week’s worth of affordable meals. Also, food manufacturers spend lots of money ensuring their products help you reach the “bliss point,” which is when the right combination of sugar, salt and fat in a food chemically produce the greatest amount of pleasure. Starting a healthy lifestyle is about realizing that it can be hard to make healthy choices, and there are natural reasons why it’s easy to make unhealthy ones.

TIP 2: START BY BREAKING IT DOWN

Before you throw out everything with a carb in it, take a step back for a few weeks and look at your eating and exercise habits. Making small, sustainable changes can be more beneficial than radical ones, like cutting out all carbs. Use apps like MyFitnessPal or a food diary to track the types of food and exercise you have on a weekly basis. Then, commit to modifying your habits in small ways—maybe popcorn instead of chips for a snack, or parking on the far end of the lot. Remember, it’s your life, and being healthy should become something you take pride in because you’re investing in a better future.

TIP 3: CREATE A SUPPORT NETWORK

Changing your lifestyle is hard, especially when your family may be used to eating out. Partnering with your spouse, a friend or group of co-workers to encourage each other to make healthy choices will increase your chances of success.

TIP 4: YOUR ACTIONS MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Your lifestyle choices have a direct impact on your loved ones, especially your spouse and children. While children whose parents are obese are more likely to struggle with weight from an early age, children who learn healthy food choices and are exposed to a variety of fruits and vegetables are more likely to carry those habits into adulthood. Choosing a healthy lifestyle at any age will increase your longevity and positively influence those around you.

Contact your local UT Extension office to find out when Pathweighs to Health will be offered near you and learn more about healthy lifestyle choices by visiting extension.tennessee.edu.


Erica Jenkins HeadshotErica Jenkins  Contact
UT System Administration

Erica joined the UT System Office of Communications and Marketing in 2011 and currently serves as public relations associate, specializing in measurement and analytics and managing communication planning for government relations and advocacy initiatives. When she’s not involved in community and campus organizations, Erica enjoys deep sea fishing with her family and working on music. 

Disclaimer
Posts represent the views, expertise and recommendations of their authors and do not necessarily reflect an endorsement by the University of Tennessee. Furthermore, the content of the blog is for informational purposes only. The content of the blog is not, and is not intended to be used as, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

Why I Only Have One Coke Per Week

By Sue Denning

Why I Only Have One Coke a Week:
Because I feel a lot better when I drink water or unsweet tea.

My Motivation:
I became more aware of studies about sugar and sweeteners and realized I just didn’t feel very good after drinking soda.

My Wellness Goal:
I try to watch what I eat, walk, chose lean proteins that give me energy, keep an eye on sodium and balance indulgences with healthier options.


Sue Denning  Contact
UT Foundation
Alumni Assistant

Disclaimer
Posts represent the views, expertise and recommendations of their authors and do not necessarily reflect an endorsement by the University of Tennessee. Furthermore, the content of the blog is for informational purposes only. The content of the blog is not, and is not intended to be used as, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

Fill Your Cup with Facts: Coffee Talk

By John Lacey

When you look at the facts, it’s pretty clear that Americans love coffee.

[Infographic] About 83% of American adults drink coffee, about 63% drink  at least 1 cup per day

According to a 2013 National Coffee Association market research study, about 83 percent of American adults drink coffee, and 63 percent drink at least one cup of coffee per day.

There’s no question that coffee is a big business, but what do the facts say about how all this consumption affects our body?

Here’s the brewdown from Chelsi Wolz, a nutrition research associate and registered dietician working in the Healthy Eating and Activity Laboratory at UT Knoxville.

[infographic] B2, B3, B5 vitaminsQ: What are the benefits of coffee?

A: Coffee is a low-calorie drink with three essential B vitamins and high amounts of antioxidant components.

 

Recent Research Findings

  • Caffeinated coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of depression among women and men.
  • Men who consume 6 or more cups of coffee a day may have a lower risk of developing prostate cancer.
  • Coffee is associated with a lower risk of depression and stroke among women and men.
  • Caffeine consumption may have a positive effect on long-term memory.

Q: What are the drawbacks to coffee?

A: Most people add milk, half-and-half or sugar to their coffee or drink specialty drinks, thus increasing the calories. One cup of black coffee is roughly 10 calories, a tall skinny latte from Starbucks is 100 calories and a tall white chocolate mocha latte from Starbucks is 350 calories.

[Infographic] One cup of black coffee is about 10 calories. Sweetened drinks containing milk and sugar can increase caloric intake by ten times

It’s easy to overconsume calories when they’re hidden.

Coffee can lead to caffeine addiction, and trying to cut back can cause headaches and other side effects. And coffee is acidic, so someone with heartburn or acid reflux might experience stomachaches or increased symptoms.


John LaceyJohn Lacey  Contact
UT System Administration

John is a UT graduate and currently works in the UT System Office of Communications and Marketing as a project manager. When he is not enjoying time with his wife and two children, you can find him riding his bike or dreaming up big ideas.

Disclaimer
Posts represent the views, expertise and recommendations of their authors and do not necessarily reflect an endorsement by the University of Tennessee. Furthermore, the content of the blog is for informational purposes only. The content of the blog is not, and is not intended to be used as, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.